Your Caribbean Journey begins in the jungle, a captivating exhibit showcasing the unique wildlife and geography of the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve in Mexico’s Eastern Yucatan Peninsula.

This magnificent space lets in natural sunlight from a massive skylight, providing a natural home for tropical flora and fauna including vibrant free-flying birds, bats, reptiles, and even a sloth.

A cenote is your gateway into this new world, guiding our guests onto a twisting jungle pathway where incredible wildlife encounters wait around every corner. Flamingos lounge in a nearby lagoon, while fish, tortoises, and shorebirds forage among the underwater roots of a mangrove forest. Crocodiles lurk at the surface of the Karst pool, while overhead the slow-moving Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth grazes in the trees. The jungle offers overhead views of the underwater world that waits below, giving an early glimpse at sharks, tropical fish, and other aquatic species. Vampire bats, a boa constrictor, and other mysterious creatures reside within the dark Mayan Ruins, waiting to be discovered.

Surrounded by the songs of Caribbean birds, tropical plants and trees, and exotic animals, this exhibit just may make you feel you’ve been actually transported to the lush jungles of the Yucatan Peninsula.

Animals in this exhibit

  • Caribbean Flamingo

    These birds get their vivid pink color from eating crustaceans. Their long necks and legs are made for wading shallow waters in search of food.

  • Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth

    Our sloth Xena is one of the world’s slowest mammals. This sloth species uses its long limbs and two-claws to move through the trees.

  • Keel-billed toucan

    Easily recognized by its characteristic large and colorful beak, the keel-billed toucan used its large bill to reach and tear apart fruit.

  • Vampire bat

    These fearsome-looking bats get their name from their preferred diet of blood, just like the famous movie monster.

  • Scarlet ibis

    This bright red bird used its curved, slender bill to forage for food in shallow water environments. Like the flamingo, the bird’s bright colors come from the crustaceans in its food.

  • Green iguana

    A common sight in tropical environments, the green iguana can often be seen basking in the sunlight, a behavior common to many cold-blooded reptiles. They can grow to over 6 feet long and weight more than 11 pounds.